Anonymous said: what's extreme is people like you not realizing that sometimes diversity can go too far. When characters are made black or disabled or gay for no reason it hurts the story and it hurts the cause of the people who are supposedly being represented.

blue-author:

I like how you sent me an ask claiming that no one says a thing except people rhetorically making fun of the position that no one actually holds, and then you send me an ask clarifying that you hold exactly the same position.

I’m kind tempted to just not address anything else you said and just marvel in the perfection of that.

What’s the reason for making a character white? What’s the reason for making a character straight? What’s the reason for making a character abled or neurotypical or cis?

When you assume that making a character Other relative to yourself weakens the narrative, you’re revealing a terrible thing about yourself: that you can’t imagine that those people have backstories and inner lives the way that you do.

Every single person in a fictional narrative is ultimately there because a writer decided they needed to be there, but when the person looks like you and matches your expectations, you accept that this person who was made up for the plot had a life full of events that led them to the point where they’re appearing on the screen or page.

But when your expectations aren’t met, you start saying it’s forced. You can’t accept that events led them here because you don’t grant them the kind of life that you know you have. Your empathy does not extend to them. 

Look at how many white people think they can relate to a little girl in an industrial orphanage who falls in with a capitalist robber baron during the Great Depression more than they can relate to a little girl in the foster system in modern New York who falls in with a career politician, all because of a difference of race. The original Annie’s situation and world were only slightly less alien to us than the Victorian period, but making her white somehow makes her relatable in a way that a little girl who clearly exists in our world isn’t.

The fact is, empathy is linked to imagination and we can (and do!) relate to people who are literally alien beings in literally alien worlds. The choice not to relate to Quvenzhané Wallis as Annie—or a Black or gay or female or trans video game character—is a choice to shut off both imagination and empathy. 

The failing is not with the narrative, it’s with you.

On character diversity, empathy and imagination

(Reblogged from dresdencodak)

Jethro loves to have fun, normally at the expense of pirating!

Polly is in a mood and doesn’t want to talk about it.

Polly is in a mood and doesn’t want to talk about it.

Sam is feistier than she looks. Don’t cross her!

Sam is feistier than she looks. Don’t cross her!

For any chefs or foodies, here’s a joke. For everyone else it’s a rooster wearing clothes with a clipboard, which should be comedy enough!

Here’s a very dapper little cat!

He looks like he knows something that you’re probably not going to like…

This is a gorgeous comic…

heyluchie:

My comic; “Introversion” is finished! Please go to the main page of my blog to read it in full size (the text is kinda small)

I really hope you’ll like it!

(Reblogged from heyluchie)

Say, Red, what have you seen down there?

Hold on buddy!